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The Amazing Story of Kudzu

There’s so much of this fast-growing vine in the Southeastern U.S., you might think it was a native plant. Actually, it took a lot of hard work to help kudzu spread so widely. Now that it covers over seven million acres of the deep South, there are a lot of people working hard to get rid of it! But kudzu is used in ways which might surprise you.

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1996 Documentary Tells Amazing Story of Kudzu

In “The Amazing Story of Kudzu” you’ll learn about kudzu’s colorful past, present and future. Travel from Chipley, Florida — where Glen Arden Nursery sold kudzu plants through the mail in the 1920s — to Covington, Georgia — where Channing Cope crowned kudzu “king” in the 1940s. Meet a 93 year old man who supervised Civilian Conservation Corps workers as they…

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Kudzu Documentary’s Enduring Legacy

I was searching for a documentary topic when I called a friend to pick his brain. “You could do a documentary on kudzu,” he said and I was drawn into a field of tangled vines that hold me to this day. That conversation was in 1994 and in it I learned that my friend’s mother… Read more »

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Southern Culture Films

All titles are for sale unless otherwise noted. See bottom of page for how to order DVDs. The Amazing Story of Kudzu There’s so much of this fast-growing vine in the Southeastern U.S., you might think it was a native plant. Actually, it has taken a lot of hard work to help kudzu spread so… Read more »

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About Max

Emmy award winning filmmaker Max Shores is a thirty-year veteran of TV and documentary film production. His work has been featured on Alabama Public Television, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, PBS stations nationwide, and the University of Alabama’s TV station, WVUA 23. Shores is a Winfield, Alabama native and a graduate of the University of Alabama. He… Read more »

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"Boom Town" Chronicles Childersburg, AL WWII Growth

By all indications, Childersburg is, and always has been, a quiet little town. But that is not the case. During the 1940s Childersburg experienced explosive growth when the US Army decided to locate an ammunition plant there. Thousands of people from across the nation came to work on the massive construction project spreading over 13,500 acres.