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1999 Documentary Traces Alabama’s Black Belt History

Called the Black Belt because of its rich, dark soil, the area of Alabama traversed by Highway 80 on its route across the southern U.S. was the staging ground for some of Alabama’s most significant moments in history. It was here that cotton plantations flourished, the Confederacy was born, and civil rights were won.

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Change Agents – The Blackburn Institute Story

The legacy of a University of Alabama educator who inspired his students to work toward improving their communities is the subject of a thirty-minute documentary from the University of Alabama Center for Public Television. Dr. John L. Blackburn was a long-time professor and student affairs administrator at the university.

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1995 Documentary Tells Poarch Creek History

The Creek Indians of south Alabama lived in isolation and poverty until Calvin McGhee came along. Despite treaty promises, they had been abandoned by the federal government. A farmer with only a fifth grade education, McGhee fought tirelessly for his people. Through court battles and meetings with government officials in which he wore traditional plains… Read more »

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Up From The Ashes: The Rebirth of Phenix City

PHENIX CITY–A public television documentary tells about the transformation of an Alabama city so wicked that Gen. George S. Patton threatened to roll his tanks across the river from Ft. Benning and destroy it. “Up From the Ashes: The Rebirth of Phenix City” shows how the National Guard crushed a crime syndicate here in 1954,… Read more »

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Bridges to the Past

Alabama’s Covered Bridges Featured in Documentary – Wooden covered bridges played an important role in the development of Alabama by providing safe passage over creeks and rivers at locations where crossing in a horse-drawn wagon or buggy would otherwise be extremely difficult or impossible. During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, hundreds of covered bridges… Read more »

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The “Preserving Justice” Documentary

In 1963, African-Americans in Birmingham, Alabama protested discrimination with daily demonstrations in public facilities and sit-ins at lunch counters. According to historian James Patterson, “More than any event to that time, it forced Americans to sit up and take notice.” In the weeks that followed, there were more than 750 demonstrations in cities across the… Read more »